SNWSpotlight


n Parts 1-4 of the Future Storage Systems articles, we focused on the SAN-facing technologies that would enable scalable propcessing growth, purpose-built technologies for deduplication and encryption, as well as the fabric that would tie nodes together.  However, in each of these articles, I never got into WHERE  that information would eventually be stored.  Today, I’m hoping to remedy that problem.  I’ll be referencing the diagram below as usual.

FSS Backend Disk Layout Options

FSS Backend Disk Layout Options

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In Part 3a, we discussed the possibility of a purpose-driven Compute Node based on the Torrenza initiative for the Future Storage system.  This expansion node made use of Hypertransport as a “glue” between the base storage compute node and the expansion node (of computation or I/O flavours) that could be added.  The advantages of that topology were simple:  hot add support for additional processing power, additional I/O bandwidth within the system, and additional computing power for the array OS (which we’ll cover in a later article).  In this overview, we’ll take a look at another variation on an expansion node: an I/O expansion node that will add additional front-end ports and/or functionality to the base system.  We will be referencing the diagram below. (Apologies in advance for the image shearing off in the lower right hand corner).

Hypertransport I/O Expansion Topology

Hypertransport I/O Expansion Topology

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