Celerra

Transition to the Cloud

by dave on August 4, 2009


Well folks, it’s been fun being your “EMC Technical Consultant on the Interweb.” (there are more of us, trust me. ;) ) It is with great happiness, however, that I get to report that I’m moving over to what has to be the most exciting innovation within EMC in the short time I’ve been here: the Cloud Infrastructure Group.  Something about the cloud moves me to fits of joy (or generally, paroxysms of short-lived hysteria) and the EMC Atmos product line, in particular, is really the future of where I see storage moving.  So, what does this mean to you, my faithful readers?

Well, I’m definitely not giving up my virtualization bent. Honestly, cloud computing is a really simple extension of virtualization and I think this is going to be the basis on which storage and technology will develop.  Abstracting the physical has always been of particular interest to me, so, this will be maintained.

I’m also not giving up on core products. Trust me, I’ve learned to love Clariions, Celerras, Centeras, Symmetrix for all that they bring to the table from a performance and capability standpoint.  That being said, again, I think the future holds some interesting developments for these products as EMC continues to push onwards and upwards into the cloud and virtualization space.

I will be adding in a lot more cloud content (i hope) as i dig into Atmos and Atmos Online product sets and hopefully, we’ll be able to discover together how EMC’s cloud vision can be realized in YOUR environment.  I’m honoured and excited by the challenges being offered me and I hope to see ya’ll in the cloud!

cheers,

Dave

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Private Clouds & Storage: Considerations

by dave on February 13, 2009


One of the current “hot” topics within the IT industry these days is the concept of cloud computing.  While there is a level of ambiguity around what cloud computing actually is, there is a definite trend towards looking at what these cloud services and storage can do for the commercial and enterprise.

Private Cloud Challenges

In a previous posting, I talked about the concept of a common cloud file system or cFS.  Some folks responded on Twitter that perhaps IBM‘s GPFS filesystem (as a part of their SOFS strategy) could indeed fulfill that role for the cloud.  As an additional twist, PaaS “connectors” such as SnapLogic, et. al. that seek to tie front-end processes or applications to underlying cloud services could simply provide a API hook to entities like Nirvanix, GoGrid, Amazon S3, etc. for handling discrete storage functions (with the obvious implications of data access/protection SLAs being separate and distinct from the middleware providers).  The provision for this changes when you start talking about privatizing the cloud.

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This is the second edition of the same post. Evidently, WordPress doesn’t like it when I fat-finger in Firefox 3.0 Beta 5. Grrrrr…..

So, what is “Search Term Tuesday” (or any other day of the week, even)? The principle of it is this: grab some of the focused searches out there that land on this site (i.e Flickerdown) and attempt to respond to them with more data. Deal? Let’s begin, then.

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Designing Storage for Microsoft SQL

May 19, 2008

It’s no secret that Microsoft’s SQL database environment is immensely popular in the market. To that end, EMC and Microsoft have developed “Best Practices” for laying out SQL databases, logs, quorums (for clustering), and TempDb on our arrays. For this entry, I thought I’d provide you with a quick overview of two different disk layouts.

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I *heart* SMB

April 24, 2008

I Love SMBThere’s somewhat of a misconception that EMC dislikes the SMB market. While it’s true that we’ve largely ignored it, our partners in the channel (Dell, CDW, to name a few) have successfully brought our Clariion lines to the mid-level companies out there and have solved their storage needs through aggressive cost-cutting, etc. […]

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