Amazon S3

Image representing Dropbox as depicted in Crun...

Image via CrunchBase

This morning, Dave Cahill (@dcahill8) posted a rather in-depth look at Carbonite and provided a counter to their business model by including Dropbox.  While Dave is a conservative guy, I’m really not, so, I took the challenge to hopefully expound upon what I think is Dropbox’s COGS model.  The original article is here: The Economics of Carbonite and I’d STRONGLY advise you to read it prior to coming here. 😉

[click to continue…]


{ 1 comment }

Hybridizing DR for the Cloud: Concerns

by dave on March 2, 2009

Over at Information Playground, Steve Todd has started down the path of no return: private clouds.  (Incidentally, I find it quite ironic that private clouds are no more private than public clouds in that they’re essentially run on the same infrastructure and face the exact same challenges for security, data mobility, and perminence that the aforementioned public clouds do…but, I digress) In his posting from last week, he details some of the challenges in looking at replication to the cloud (whether public or private is a mere stroke of the pen difference).  The good news is: he’s not alone in thinking this way. The bad news: well, we’ll get to that.  Let’s begin…

[click to continue…]



Private Clouds & Storage: Considerations

by dave on February 13, 2009

One of the current “hot” topics within the IT industry these days is the concept of cloud computing.  While there is a level of ambiguity around what cloud computing actually is, there is a definite trend towards looking at what these cloud services and storage can do for the commercial and enterprise.

Private Cloud Challenges

In a previous posting, I talked about the concept of a common cloud file system or cFS.  Some folks responded on Twitter that perhaps IBM‘s GPFS filesystem (as a part of their SOFS strategy) could indeed fulfill that role for the cloud.  As an additional twist, PaaS “connectors” such as SnapLogic, et. al. that seek to tie front-end processes or applications to underlying cloud services could simply provide a API hook to entities like Nirvanix, GoGrid, Amazon S3, etc. for handling discrete storage functions (with the obvious implications of data access/protection SLAs being separate and distinct from the middleware providers).  The provision for this changes when you start talking about privatizing the cloud.

[click to continue…]