Cloud Personality Types…

by dave on February 20, 2009

In the mental health world, a lot of talk is made about various pathologies, their presentations, as well as tying them to certain personality types that pre-dispose them to affliction.  That’s a mouthful to process through, but the same type of examination can be applied to those who engage in “cloud oriented behaviour.”  Here is my DSM of cloud personality types.

Update on 4/13/11:  So, @djenningspr and I have been going back and forth re: the concept of “Cloud Darwinism.”  While not truly a personality type, there IS the idea that it would nest quite well amongst this list…here we go, then…

The “Cloud Darwinist” – (cloud darwinism; cloud darwinist) – This is the person who, for all intents and purposes, is devoted to the “survival of the fittest” or, perhaps more succinctly, he “calls it like he sees it.”  Through careful examination of analyst reports, public P&L sheets for CSSPs, etc. he attempts to determine if micro-evolution of CSSPs can possibly occur or whether macro evolution of provider SLAs, infrastructure, etc. can truly allow a CSSP to survive in this “cloudy” day & age.  (attrib to @davegraham & @djenningspr)

The “Cloud Idiot” – (cloudiot) – This is the person who thinks they know more about the cloud than anyone else. They’re constantly on the prowl for the “what is …?” questions on social media platforms and provide blustery responses with vapid data validation.  Oftentimes, these folks are proven wrong in a rather humiliating and public fashion.

The “Cloud Chaser” – (cloudparazzi) – This is the person who is “All cloud, all the time” and is looking for the next “big thing” in the the cloud “atmosphere.”  Usually found trolling for data at Geva Perry‘s blog or accosting CTOs, VPs, etc. on social media.

The “Cloud Antagonist” – (cloudagonist) – This is the commiserate cloud “hater.”  This person loves DAS storage, SANs, divided fabrics and can be found extoling the virtues of direct server management via commandline and a collection of USB sticks.

The “Cloud Masochist” – (cloudochist) – This person, as opposed to the cloudagonist, is ALL in the cloud.  Using S3, GoGrid, SnapLogic, et al. as his storage and processing via EC2, the cloudochist is “putting the hurt on” those naysayers who think the cloud is bad for business.  Incidentally, the cloudochist gets unpaid vacation when the backend services go down.

The “Cloud Evangelist” – (cloudgelist) – This person extols the virtues of the cloud and it’s capabilities without ever having used any of the services. Ignorance, while blissful, doesn’t pay the bills. However, certain cloudgelists have noted that they use the product (whether it’s their own, who knows?) and it does indeed lessen wrinkles and promotes good colon health…wait, that’s something else entirely! UPDATE:  @CXI mentioned that the cloudgelist can use the cloud and still extol its virtues. Far be it from me to exclude anyone. definition revised/extended.

The “Cloud Manic” – (cloudpolar) – This person alternatively loves AND hates the cloud and all it stands for within a given week. Can usually be found smack talking a vendor about their primary storage platform in the cloud while loving on a PaaS vendor for “connecting the dots.” Rinse and repeat.

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Updates (sort of)

by dave on April 13, 2008

I’m trying to keep tabs on the influx of various searches and technologies that are out there in the storage world. To that end, I’m going to do a couple of things:

a.) In the not-so-distant-future, you’re going to see me doing a lot of video presentations on this blog. I’ve got a long commute to work (> 45 minutes on most days) and I’ve got a perfect “mount” for a video camera on my dashboard. I think I’ll call the series “Storage Drive-bys” (get it?) and I’ll try to keep it to subjects that you search on (i.e. Symmetrix, EMC core, Clariion, Centera, Celerra, EDL etc. etc.) This could be a LOT of fun, so, we’ll see what happens. In fairness to you, I’ll post the disclaimer at the beginning of each video but I’ll be honest about what I think regarding each relative technology. Deal?

b.) I’m also going to keep up with a weekly “respond to your search” posting that will attempt to answer the searches (based on the stats logging I see through WordPress) that I deem most “interesting.” Stuff like “weird science Dave Graham” and “scribd” will probably NOT make the cut. 😉

With this in mind, I’m off to study for my certification exams…





More on the SAS vs. Fibre debate

by dave on March 25, 2008

Connectivity Reliability

At some point, I had typed in a bit about the physical interfaces present on both the SAS and Fibre drives. I appears that I ran roughshod over that particular point which, upon thinking about it, is a very important dimension of drive reliability.

As noted previously, SAS drives use an amended SATA data+power connectivity schema. Instead of a notch between the data and power connections as present on SATA drives, SAS drives simply “bridge” that gap with an extra helping of plastic. This not only turns the somewhat flimsy SATA connectors into a more robust solution, it also requires that the host connector support that bridging. Interesting note here is that the SAS host connector supports SATA drives but SATA host connectors will not support SAS. This is somewhat assuaged by various host implementations (i.e. using a SAS connector on a backplane with discrete SATA data connectivity from the backplane to the mainboard) but generally, this is the rule. The SAS drives feature a male connectivity block which is mated to a female SAS connectivity block on the host system. Pretty basic stuff.

Fibre drives, on the other hand, use a SCA (single connector edge) medium that is again male on the drive side and female on the host side. Definitely more simplistic in design and implementation (and is featured within all current EMC arrays) and honestly, when push comes to shove, something I would trust inherently more with protection. The same idea is present with SCA80 Ultra320 SCSI drives as well. The fitment here is definitely more secure with less design stress placed on the physical connector (and thusly the PCB itself) than with the SAS solution.

There are always caveats with distinct designs, however, and I’d like to highlight some below.
a.) The SAS data+power connector is inherently MORE secure than the standard SATA interface. Truth be told, I’ve broken SATA data connectors. It’s really not hard since the data connection is a discrete “tab” from the power interface (which I’ve broken as well). The addition of the plastic “bridge” between data and power connections on SAS drives promotes a stronger bond between the connector (whether that be SFF or backplane based) and the drive itself. It also keeps folks from mistakenly connecting SAS drives to SATA ports. 😉
b.) The SAS interface is still prone to breakage as compared to SCA40/80 connections. There’s a reason why we do a conversion within our drive caddies from SATA to Fibre (outside of the obvious protocol translation and sniffer obligations): it’s more secure. The mating mechanism within the SCA interface provides no single point of stress on the connector as there is a nesting process that takes place. Not so with the SAS interface: you have a significant protrusion into the caddy area that, if improperly aligned, can cause damage. If you misalign the SCA interface, you can’t make the connection and there’s no protrusion difficulties.

Note: The good news in all of this (at least from my perspective @ EMC) is that we’re not going to allow you to screw this connectivity up. 😉 We mount the drives in our carriers, put them in the array and, well, we’ve got you covered. 😉

In any case, this is really for further clarification from yesterday’s post. Hopefully that will give a little more food for thought.

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More on Corporate Blogging…

August 20, 2007

Sorry for another post so quickly in the day, but I just happened to stumble upon Jeremiah Owyang’s excellent blog entry entitled “How Blogs can help a Corporation.”  While he makes some very valid points about some of the more tenacious exchanges out there (StorageZilla and Robin Harris), I think he missed something along the […]

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Corporate Culture

August 20, 2007

Welcome to Monday! (I think).  I was lying wide awake in bed last night and thinking about my last blog entry in response to Robin Harris.  While certain things irritate me to no end, bad assumptions about a company’s culture are a verifiable maelstrom of discord in my psyche. (Whew! that was a mouthful).  So, […]

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